Sanus.jpgSo, you’ve just picked up that new TV you’ve been coveting. You’re beyond thrilled; and seeing as though you’ve spent the last several months pinning décor examples on Pinterest, you know exactly where it should be mounted. But before you jump headfirst into securing your new toy on the wall, there are a few things to keep in mind when selecting a TV mount. Here’s the skinny on the three key considerations you need to keep in mind.

Type: Static or Motion

TDynex-Flat-Mount.jpghe first thing you need to consider is where you are going to mount your TV since the placement on the wall will dictate which type of mount will suit your needs. If your plan is to mount your TV right at eye level, then a fixed wall mount like this one from Dynex will do the job nicely. Why, you ask? Because fixed mounts will keep your TV snug against the wall, so when you look at the TV from the side, you’re not faced with a ton of needless hardware. Plus, as the name suggests, your TV will remain in a fixed position as close to the wall as possible.

Alternatively, if your plan is to mount your TV above eye level, then you should look for a tilting mount. With this type of mount, your TV will still stay relatively close to the wall, but will give you the ability to tilt it up or down so you can angle it towards its viewers to reduce neck strain or glare. Some tilting mounts like this one from Sanus let you tilt 12 degrees up or 7 degrees down, while others, like this one from TygerClaw lets you tilt 15 degrees up and down. So even within the “tilting mount” category, you really need to know how much of an angle you’ll need to tilt your TV for optimum viewing enjoyment. The higher up on the wall it is, the more of an angle you’ll want.

A third option is Sanus-2.jpga full motion mount. With one like this one from Sanus, you can pull your TV out from the wall and move it up, down and side-to-side, or tilt it to get the best viewing angle possible. Full motion mounts are ideal for situations when your TV serves more than one room. For example, it might be mounted in your living room, but you also want to watch the same TV from your kitchen. Their flexibility allows for a seamless transition. The only caveat with full motion mounts is that due to their functionality, they tend to stick out further from the wall than fixed or tilting mounts.

Size & Weight

Rocketfish.jpgNow that you’ve determined which type of mount will work for you, you need to select one that is designed for the size and weight of your TV. It’s important to remember than no two TV’s are identical and a difference in size of a few inches can equate to an increase of a pound or more. Thankfully, determining which mount will work for you is a matter of knowing how much your TV weighs, how big it is, and then ensuring that the mount you select is rated for the specifications. Don’t guestimate its weight! The specs of any TV mount aren’t something you want to mess with. Can you imagine mounting your brand new 60” 4K Ultra-HD TV only for it to come crashing down because you chose a mount that was “in the ballpark” of how much your TV weighed? Ugh, that is SO something I can see myself doing.

The good news though is that most mounts can accommodate a range of sizes and weights. For example, this tilting mount from Rocketfish can accommodate TVs ranging in size from 26” to 40” and up to 80 pounds in weight. That’s a lot of leeway. So I repeat, do not choose a mount that is not designed to handle the size and weight of your TV.

When it comes to choosing a TV mount there are really only a few key things you need to take into consideration: (1) where are you going to mount it? Will it be at eye level or above? (2) How will it be used? Will you need to be able to see your TV from different rooms or extreme viewing angles? (3) How much does it weight? And how big is it? Armed with that information, you can narrow your search down to a few models and select whichever suits your budget.

 

2 COMMENTS


  1. StaceyMac wrote:

     

    A third option is a full motion mount. With one like this one from Sanus, you can pull your TV out from the wall and move it up, down and side-to-side, or tilt it to get the best viewing angle possible. Full motion mounts are ideal for situations when your TV serves more than one room. For example, it might be mounted in your living room, but you also want to watch the same TV from your kitchen. Their flexibility allows for a seamless transition. The only caveat with full motion mounts is that due to their functionality, they tend to stick out further from the wall than fixed or tilting mounts.

     


    Another plus with full motion mounts is the easy access to ports behind the TV.

  2. There are also other precautions that must be considered, before selecting the mount.

    In the case of high-rise buildings where steel framing is used, full motion mounts are NOT recommended.

    The reason is because as weight is moved away from the fulcrum(mount), the force on the support will increase dramatically. The larger the panel, the further it needs to be away from the wall, in order to “swivel” out enough, to be viewed from extreme angles. such that at approx. 20 inches, a force of approx 2000lbs. is required on the support.

     

    Ensuring that the mount is directly attached to minimum 2 studs will allow proper support. In many cases, adding back support and pre-wiring electrical and cable conduit (avoid 90 degree bends, use 2-45’s ) during construction phase, help with maintaining a clean look.

    Keep in mind also, there is potential for bent TV frames with full motion mounts, if not used properly.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

Comments are closed.